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Here Comes the King!

Of all the plants classified as adaptogens, the one with the most renown is eleuthero!  Eleuthero has been the subject of thousands of scientific studies, in dozens of countries and its benefits have been extremely well documented.

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In fact, in the 16th century Li Shih-Chen, a Chinese pharmacologist and physician wrote a 52-volume manuscript detailing the treatments used in traditional Chinese medicine. He covered over 10,000 substances, but there was one herb in particular that stood out to him. When it came to the herb eleuthero, he saw no comparison.

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He wrote, “I would rather take a handful of eleuthero than a cartload of gold and jewels.”

Eleuthero is native to Eastern Asia and is found primarily in mountain forests.   It has been called the king of adaptogens, because of its almost endless list of benefits endless.  Eleuthero has been used as a treatment for:

  • Cold & flu
  • Stress & anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Weakened immunity
  • Emotional imbalance

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Eleuthero is also a top choice for athletes and fitness enthusiasts.  Dr. Ben Tabachnik, a former Soviet sports nutrition researcher and coach, attributes eleuthero to helping the Soviet Olympic team dominate the 1988 Olympics.  Athletes who supplement with eleuthero report significant improvements in:

  • Peripheral vison
  • Reaction time
  • Stamina
  • Suppression of increased cortisol
  • Oxygen uptake
  • Lung capacity
  • Faster recovery

So, whether you are a professional athlete looking for an edge, a weekend warrior trying to relive your glory days or just a soccer mom looking for greater stamina and better immunity, eleuthero could very well be the perfect supplement.  Look to the king of adaptogens, eleuthero.

Adaptogens Provide Broad Mind/Body Benefits – Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews

You may be one of the millions of people who are looking to feel better. Perhaps you want to improve your immune system or simply get over bronchitis. Maybe you are hoping to avoid coming down with a cold this year or possibly you want to take steps now to avoid future health problems. Or, perhaps you wish you had more endurance and stamina. If you’re a runner or a biker or are hoping to schedule your next triathalon, you probably would love to find a way to increase your ability to train and get better results.

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Another category of people who are looking for help are those who would like to be less anxious, more emotionally stable or less depressed. Better quality sleep, lower blood sugar, improved liver functioning….this list of what we wish for can go on and on. The sum-up here is that most people want better health.

We know that you can’t get healthy by taking a pill.  It’s just common sense, isn’t it?  However, there are some plants that are almost as good as free health in a pill: Adaptogens.

adaptogen-pill  Adaptogens are plants that have been shown to have “non-specific” beneficial effects. What this means is that the effects are not limited to one area; multiple areas of the body will benefit from one plant. You can think if this effect somewhat like nutrition: if your cell mitochondria are fed by nutrients, your whole body will benefit. Adaptogenic plants will not only help you feel more energetic, they will usually help lift your mood, boost your immune system and provide a variety of other benefits including (and not limited to) protecting the liver and improving liver functioning, protecting the heart and improving cardiac function, protecting the brain from beta-amyloid plaques that are associated with degenerative brain disorders like Parkinson’s disease, soothing and strengthening gut tissues and functioning, and much more.

Look forward to future posts that will discuss specific adaptogens, current research, and other adaptogen-related health concepts and concerns.

 

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Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews is an expert contributor to the AdaptoGenie blog.  Dr. Caldwell-Andrews received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kentucky and completed a post-doc in Mind-Body Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine.  As a faculty member at Yale, she served as Director of Research for the Yale Perioperative Research Group, conducting clinical research and publishing 30 articles in peer-reviewed journals.

Her interest in mind-body healing began in the early 1990’s and she is a Certified Nutritional Herbalist.  She’s an active public speaker, author, conducts workshops, and consults in the areas of creating success behaviors, herbs and the mind-body connection, and science-based holistic treatment for psychiatric disorders.

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